Mild Cognitive Impairment


The assessment of neurocognitive deficits in mild cognitive impairment is of great interest both clinically and in clinical trials of medications that may prove to be disease-modifying agents. This is because MCI is viewed as a transitional stage between normal cognition and dementia. The neurocognitive endpoint that has been traditionally used in Alzheimer’s clinical trials, the ADAS-Cog, has been repeatedly demonstrated to be insensitive to detecting impairment or change over time in MCI and mild Alzheimer’s disease. Since the RBANS is capable of measuring a full range of function in normal elderly, without ceiling or floor effects, it should prove to be an ideal instrument for detecting and tracking MCI. The following articles are relevant:

Badenes et al. (2007) reported that the RBANS was sensitive to detecting impairment in patients with MCI, and that RBANS scores in these patients were predictive of functional capabilities (driving performance).

Mahnke et al. (2006) reported that the RBANS was sensitive to detecting change in normal elderly who underwent a computer-based memory enhancement program. This suggests that the RBANS will be sensitive to the effects of symptomatic treatments even in fairly high-functioning older individuals.

Kotani et al. (2006) reported that the RBANS was sensitive to treatment effects in a small clinical trial in MCI.